Solved! <name> is offline try text instead message on windowsphone

I was getting the following message from my windows phone when I tried to text someone using my Lumia 521.

<name> is offline try text instead

It turns out that I could use either the Text service or Messenger service to communicate to this person.  When I used the Messenger service, I was getting the “… is offline try text instead” message.  By switching from Messenger to Text via the button on the bottom that has two arrows, one pointing left and another pointing right (see green box below), I was able to text using the SMS method (i.e., the texting method I pay my T-mobile carrier for) by selecting text mobile instead of Messenger.  I did this because the Messenger option indicated that the person I wanted to contact was offline.

image

I’m not sure how I got the Messenger program.  Its possible that the Messenger program loaded when I installed Skype on my Windows Phone but I’m not exactly quite sure.  After I uninstalled Skype, the Messenger option was still present next to the person I wanted to contact.

It wasn’t intuitive to do this so I’m posting this solution on my blog hoping that it will help someone.

Good luck!

Possible solution to *E,EXPLPA … expecting a left parenthesis …error message

I was getting the following error message when I was initially creating a Verilog testbench

irun: 11.10-s062: (c) Copyright 1995-2012 Cadence Design Systems, Inc.
file: ./phy_tst.v
   logic [3:0]  TXN;
         |
ncvlog: *E,EXPLPA (./phy_tst.v,44|9): expecting a left parenthesis (‘(‘) [12.1.2][7.1(IEEE)].
   logic [3:0]  TXN;
                   |
ncvlog: *E,EXPLPA (./phy_tst.v,44|19): expecting a left parenthesis (‘(‘) [12.1.2][7.1(IEEE)].
    module worklib.phy_tst:v
        errors: 2, warnings: 0
ncvlog: *F,NOTOPL: no top-level unit found, must have recursive instances.
irun: *E,VLGERR: An error occurred during parsing.  Review the log file for errors with the code *E and fix those identified problems to proceed.  Exiting with code (status 2)

The solution is to add the +sv switch to your simulation command line

irun +sv phy_tst.v

I hope that helps someone out there ;)

Titanfall Trailer!

paritycheck:

Love this trailer!

Originally posted on Gaming. :

The new Titanfall trailer! My first next-gen game (Aside from CoD) :D I highly recommend it.

View original

A fix for OneDrive not syncing

Every now and then I see that OneDrive/SkyDrive on my computer doesn’t sync with the cloud.  I find that it usually happens when I go back and forth between a network that has disabled OneDrive (i.e., my work for security reasons) and my home.  I think that when I’m at work, the OneDrive/SkyDrive software keeps trying to sync and ends up getting confused in one way or the other.

I’ve found the solution to this problem.  If you click on this link , it will download and run software that fixes the problem.  When it runs, it could take up to 10-15 minutes to completely fix the problem.

This link was sourced from a Microsoft site found here.  So, if you don’t trust this blog’s download, you can always grab the one from Microsoft.  It is from step 6 of the Answer.

Good luck and have a good day!

Cyclic Redundancy Check (CRC) generation–How to convert a polynomial into a logic circuit that calculates CRC using a parallel equations

This write-up can be supplemented by this article on Wikipedia.

Below is an example of converting CRC-8-ATM polynomial x^8 + x^2 + x + 1 into a parallel circuit for calculating CRC.  I’ll first go through the exercise of how the serial implementation works then describe how to derive a parallel circuit.

The polynomial (x^8 + x^2 + x + 1) converts into a serial implementation like so…

image

For the purposes of clarity, I’ll be calling the flops in this circuit crc. Since this circuit has 8-bits of registers, it creates an 8-bit CRC value or crc[7:0].  In order to create the CRC value, the registers are first loaded with an input message followed by trailing zeroes.  Using the example from the Wikipedia link above, if the input message was 0101_0111 (0x57), the value shifted into the circuit will be 0101_0111_0000_0000 or (0x5700).

To illustrate using more detail, the table below shows the contents of each crc register bit as we shift the input message and trailing zeroes into the serial circuit.  Please note the following:

  • Initially, the circuit’s flops are reset or defaulted to 0.
  • The next value of crc[7] is the contents of crc[6]
  • The next value of crc[6] is the contents of crc[5]
  • The next value of crc[5] is the contents of crc[4]
  • The next value of crc[4] is the contents of crc[3]
  • The next value of crc[3] is the contents of crc[2]
  • The next value of crc[2] is the contents of crc[1] Exclusive-ORed with the contents of crc[7]
  • The next value of crc[1] is the contents of crc[0] Exclusive-ORed with the contents of crc[7]
  • The next value of crc[0] is input Exclusive-ORed with the contents of crc[7]
  •  

      crc[7] crc[6] crc[5] crc[4] crc[3] crc[2] crc[1] crc[0] input
    initial value 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
    step 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
    step 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
    step 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1
    step 4 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0
    step 5 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1
    step 6 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 1
    step 7 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 1
    step 8 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 0
    step 9 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0
    step 10 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 0
    step 11 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0
    step 12 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 0
    step 13 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 0
    step 14 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 0
    step 15 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
    step 16 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0  

    The final CRC value that is taken from row step 16 is 1010_0010 or 0xA2 in hexadecimal.

    In order to convert the serial circuit to a parallel version, we need to create Exclusive-OR (XOR) equations for each flop.  The symbol for Exclusive-OR is “^”.  We can do this my following a similar method (i.e., shifting) as the previous example except that we use variables instead.  Using a table as before, we still have an 8-bit register, but this time we will call the input variable in[7:0].

      crc[7] crc[6] crc[5] crc[4] crc[3] crc[2] crc[1] crc[0] input
    initial value 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 in[7]
    step 1 crc[6] crc[5] crc[4] crc[3] crc[2] crc[1]
    ^ crc[7]
    crc[0] ^ crc[7] in[7] ^ crc[7] in[6]
    step 2 crc[5] crc[4] crc[3] crc[2] crc[1]
    ^ crc[7]
    crc[0] ^ crc[7] ^ crc[6] in[7] ^ crc[7] ^ crc[6] in[6] ^ crc[6] in[5]
    step 3 crc[4] crc[3] crc[2] crc[1]
    ^ crc[7]
    crc[0] ^ crc[7] ^ crc[6] in[7] ^ crc[7] ^ crc[6] ^ crc[5] in[6] ^ crc[6] ^ crc[5] in[5] ^ crc[5] in[4]
    step 4 crc[3] crc[2] crc[1]
    ^ crc[7]
    crc[0] ^ crc[7] ^ crc[6] in[7] ^ crc[7] ^ crc[6] ^ crc[5] in[6] ^ crc[6] ^ crc[5] ^ crc[4] in[5] ^ crc[5] ^ crc[4] in[4] ^ crc[4] in[3]
    step 5 crc[2] crc[1]
    ^ crc[7]
    crc[0] ^ crc[7] ^ crc[6] in[7] ^ crc[7] ^ crc[6] ^ crc[5] in[6] ^ crc[6] ^ crc[5] ^ crc[4] in[5] ^ crc[5] ^ crc[4] ^ crc[3] in[4] ^ crc[4] ^ crc[3] in[3] ^ crc[3] in[2]
    step 6 crc[1]
    ^ crc[7]
    crc[0] ^ crc[7] ^ crc[6] in[7] ^ crc[7] ^ crc[6] ^ crc[5] in[6] ^ crc[6] ^ crc[5] ^ crc[4] in[5] ^ crc[5] ^ crc[4] ^ crc[3] in[4] ^ crc[4] ^ crc[3] ^ crc[2] in[3] ^ crc[3] ^ crc[2] in[2] ^ crc[2] in[1]
    step 7 crc[0] ^ crc[7] ^ crc[6] in[7] ^ crc[7] ^ crc[6] ^ crc[5] in[6] ^ crc[6] ^ crc[5] ^ crc[4] in[5] ^ crc[5] ^ crc[4] ^ crc[3] in[4] ^ crc[4] ^ crc[3] ^ crc[2] in[3] ^ crc[3] ^ crc[2] ^ crc[1]
    ^ crc[7]
    in[2] ^ crc[2] ^ crc[1]
    ^ crc[7]
    in[1] ^ crc[1]
    ^ crc[7]
    in[0]
    step 8 in[7] ^ crc[7] ^ crc[6] ^ crc[5] in[6] ^ crc[6] ^ crc[5] ^ crc[4] in[5] ^ crc[5] ^ crc[4] ^ crc[3] in[4] ^ crc[4] ^ crc[3] ^ crc[2] in[3] ^ crc[3] ^ crc[2] ^ crc[1]
    ^ crc[7]
    in[2] ^ crc[2] ^ crc[1]
    ^ crc[7] ^ crc[0] ^ crc[7] ^ crc[6]
    in[1] ^ crc[1]
    ^ crc[7] ^ crc[0] ^ crc[7] ^ crc[6]
    in[0] ^ crc[0] ^ crc[7] ^ crc[6]  
    Removing any duplicate XOR-pairs to simplify in[7] ^ crc[7] ^ crc[6] ^ crc[5] in[6] ^ crc[6] ^ crc[5] ^ crc[4] in[5] ^ crc[5] ^ crc[4] ^ crc[3] in[4] ^ crc[4] ^ crc[3] ^ crc[2] in[3] ^ crc[3] ^ crc[2] ^ crc[1]
    ^ crc[7]
    in[2] ^ crc[2] ^ crc[1]
    ^ crc[7] ^ crc[0] ^ crc[7] ^ crc[6]
    in[1] ^ crc[1]
    ^ crc[7] ^ crc[0] ^ crc[7] ^ crc[6]
    in[0] ^ crc[0] ^ crc[7] ^ crc[6]  
    Final equations for each crc flip flop in[7] ^ crc[7] ^ crc[6] ^ crc[5] in[6] ^ crc[6] ^ crc[5] ^ crc[4] in[5] ^ crc[5] ^ crc[4] ^ crc[3] in[4] ^ crc[4] ^ crc[3] ^ crc[2] in[3] ^ crc[3] ^ crc[2] ^ crc[1]
    ^ crc[7]
    in[2] ^ crc[2] ^ crc[1]
    ^ crc[0] ^ crc[6]
    in[1] ^ crc[1]
    ^ crc[0] ^ crc[6]
    in[0] ^ crc[0] ^ crc[7] ^ crc[6]  

    The Verilog equations would look like the following:

       always_comb begin

             next_crc[0] = crc[0] ^ crc[6] ^ crc[7] ^ in[0];

             next_crc[1] = crc[0] ^ crc[1] ^ crc[6] ^ in[1];

             next_crc[2] = crc[0] ^ crc[1] ^ crc[2] ^ crc[6] ^ in[2];

             next_crc[3] = crc[1] ^ crc[2] ^ crc[3] ^ crc[7] ^ in[3];

             next_crc[4] = crc[2] ^ crc[3] ^ crc[4] ^ in[4];

             next_crc[5] = crc[3] ^ crc[4] ^ crc[5] ^ in[5];

             next_crc[6] = crc[4] ^ crc[5] ^ crc[6] ^ in[6];

             next_crc[7] = crc[5] ^ crc[6] ^ crc[7] ^ in[7];

       end

    To test that the equations are correct, we apply the input.  However, instead of applying the input serially, we apply it in parallel.  The input we drive in is 0x5700 or 0101_0111_0000_0000

    We first apply the first byte, 0101_0111 (0x57).  Note that the initial values of the crc[7:0] register is 0.

     

      crc[7] crc[6] crc[5] crc[4] crc[3] crc[2] crc[1] crc[0] input
      0 ^ 0 ^ 0 ^ 0 1 ^ 0 ^ 0 ^ 0 0 ^ 0 ^ 0 ^ 0 1 ^ 0 ^ 0 ^ 0 0 ^ 0 ^ 0 ^ 0 ^ 0 1 ^ 0 ^ 0 ^ 0 ^ 0 1 ^ 0 ^ 0 ^ 0 1 ^ 0 ^ 0 ^ 0 0x57
    contents of crc register after input of 0x57 applied 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 1  

    Next, we apply the second and final byte of trailing zeroes.

      crc[7] crc[6] crc[5] crc[4] crc[3] crc[2] crc[1] crc[0] input
      0 ^ 0 ^ 1 ^ 0 0 ^ 1 ^ 0 ^ 1 0 ^ 0 ^ 1 ^ 0 0 ^ 1 ^ 0 ^ 1 0 ^ 0 ^ 1 ^ 1 ^ 0 0 ^ 1 ^ 1 ^ 1 ^ 1 0 ^ 1 ^ 1 ^ 1 0 ^ 1 ^ 0 ^ 1 0x00
    contents of crc register after input of 0x00 applied 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0  

    The contents of the CRC register is now 1010_0010 or 0xA2, the same value using the serial version of the circuit after we serially shifted in the last 8 bits of trailing zeroes.

    In cases where the input bus is larger than the CRC value, we can iterate through the shift register the same number of times as the input bus to create the parallel XOR equations for each crc register bit.  Using our previous example, the input bus was 8 bits wide.  If the input bus was 16 bits wide, the crc register bus still stays 8-bits wide but the equation changes.  I’ll leave it to you, the reader, to figure out how to get the result below.

       always_comb begin

             next_crc[0] = crc[0] ^ crc[4] ^ crc[6] ^ crc_in[0] ^ crc_in[14] ^ crc_in[15] ^ crc_in[8];

             next_crc[1] = crc[1] ^ crc[4] ^ crc[5] ^ crc[6] ^ crc[7] ^ crc_in[14] ^ crc_in[1] ^ crc_in[8] ^ crc_in[9];

             next_crc[2] = crc[0] ^ crc[2] ^ crc[4] ^ crc[5] ^ crc[7] ^ crc_in[10] ^ crc_in[14] ^ crc_in[2] ^ crc_in[8] ^ crc_in[9];

             next_crc[3] = crc[1] ^ crc[3] ^ crc[5] ^ crc[6] ^ crc_in[10] ^ crc_in[11] ^ crc_in[15] ^ crc_in[3] ^ crc_in[9];

             next_crc[4] = crc[0] ^ crc[2] ^ crc[4] ^ crc[6] ^ crc[7] ^ crc_in[10] ^ crc_in[11] ^ crc_in[12] ^ crc_in[4];

             next_crc[5] = crc[1] ^ crc[3] ^ crc[5] ^ crc[7] ^ crc_in[11] ^ crc_in[12] ^ crc_in[13] ^ crc_in[5];

             next_crc[6] = crc[2] ^ crc[4] ^ crc[6] ^ crc_in[12] ^ crc_in[13] ^ crc_in[14] ^ crc_in[6];

             next_crc[7] = crc[3] ^ crc[5] ^ crc[7] ^ crc_in[13] ^ crc_in[14] ^ crc_in[15] ^ crc_in[7];

       end

    Again, to test if the circuit is working properly, we apply an input of 0101_0111_0000_0000 (0x5700) in one step.  Again, the initial value of the flops are zeroes.

      crc[7] crc[6] crc[5] crc[4] crc[3] crc[2] crc[1] crc[0] input
      0 ^ 1 ^ 0 ^ 0 1 ^ 0 ^ 1 0 ^ 1 ^ 0 ^ 0 1 ^ 0 ^ 1 ^ 0 1 ^ 0 ^ 0 ^ 0 ^ 1 1 ^ 1 ^ 0 ^ 1 ^ 1 1 ^ 0 ^ 1 ^ 1 0 ^ 1 ^ 0 ^ 1 0x5700
    contents of crc register after input of 0x5700 applied 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0

    1010_0010 or 0xA2 is the same answer as the previous examples.

    I’ve implemented CRC generators several times but I usually forget how to do it especially when I’ve been working on something else for a long period of time.  I’ve documented it here so I don’t forget and to also help my fellow logic designers.  Although this may not apply directly to the problem you are trying to solve, I hope you find the process of obtaining the crc logic helpful.

    Titanfall Tips

    image

    Its been a long time since I’ve played First Person Shooters and I’ve been playing the production release of Titanfall since it came out on March 11, 2014.  The game is definitely fast-paced and the graphics are enjoyable to watch. 

    When I first started to play the game, I was averaging 0 kills most of the time especially when I played Attrition.  Talk about frustrating!  Now, I currently average between 2-4 kills per match.

    Most of the time, I play Hardpoint.  I find it more enjoyable since there is a goal I can work toward besides just killing the enemy.  I’m nowhere near being a good player yet, so I’m using NVidia’s ShadowPlay to help me improve my game.  ShadowPlay is used to record the game from beginning to end so that I can watch the replay afterwards. 

    Here are my notes after studying my replays.  I’ll continue to update this page as I play more. 

    Things to practice

      1. Jump and spin around to see who is shooting at you
      2. Use the “Q” key to camouflage as often as possible especially when entering into another room through the windows or doors.
      3. As soon as you see someone, shoot!  Don’t wait to recognize whether it’s a teammate or enemy.
      4. Reload while running.  I’ve gotten killed several times while I was standing still reloading.
      5. If you are a Pilot and a Titan sees you, just get out of there.  Don’t go head-to-head against a Titan if you are a Pilot.
      6. Don’t reload while in a firefight.  I got caught up in the heat of a battle that I run out of bullets and I’m reloading in the middle of a fight.
      7. Learn to keep moving while shooting the enemy

      Hardpoint tips

    1. Don’t reload at a Hardpoint.  Switch to Secondary weapon after using Primary weapon.  In this way, you won’t be caught off guard when the enemy pops into view
    2. Don’t be out in the open on the ground especially if there are enemy Titans nearby
    3. Although I hate campers, defending a Hardpoint could potentially increase your kill count
    4. Arcmines are great for defending a Hardpoint

    Microsoft needs to fix SkyDrive so that it works 100% of the time!

    I’m running the 64-bit version of Windows 8.1 Pro.  I noticed that there are times when SkyDrive in File Explorer won’t upload files even if SkyDrive Sync Engine Host is running.  I see this complaint everywhere on the internet.

    In my particular case, I had a PDF file that was 8,264 KB in size.  For some unknown reason, SkyDrive simply didn’t upload the file no matter how long I waited.  I ran skydrive.exe /reset many times and also ran their SkyDrive troubleshooter but to no avail.  I even ran the SkyDrive App and clicked on the Sync button.

    The only way I was able to get SkyDrive to upload the file was to go to my online account, select OneDrive and upload the file using the browser!

    For the most part, I enjoy Microsoft products but its times like these that make me really pissed off about using their products.

    My suggestion would be that they add a way to force uploading/downloading files in File Explorer.  Using the SkyDrive App just doesn’t cut it when I’m in desktop mode.

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